Sara Pennypacker

The Story of a Boy and His Fox

Pax and Peter have been inseparable ever since Peter rescued him as a kit. But one day, the unimaginable happens: Peter's dad enlists in the military and makes him return the fox to the wild.

At his grandfather's house, three hundred miles away from home, Peter knows he isn't where he should be with Pax. He strikes out on his own despite the encroaching war, spurred by love, loyalty, and grief, to be reunited with his fox.

Meanwhile Pax, steadfastly waiting for his boy, embarks on adventures and discoveries of his own. . . . 

Completely Clementine in paperback!

Summer is coming, and Clementine is not ready. She is not ready to start speaking to her father again, because she's still mad at him for eating meat. Instead, she has to express her sadness by giving him drawings of animals she knows would not want to be somebody's dinner. 

Then there is the new baby on the way. Clementine's mom sure doesn't seem ready. She's suddenly crazy about cleaning (Dad says she is "nesting"), but she doesn't even have a name picked out yet. Clementine just hopes the baby won't be a dud. 

What Clementine "really" isn't ready for is saying good-bye to her third grade teacher. She knows Mr. D'Matz is going to tell her all kinds of things that aren't true. Everything else may be changing around her, but that doesn't mean that Clementine has. 

But which is worse, saying good-bye, or "not" saying good-bye?

Meet the Author: Sara Pennypacker

Sara Pennypacker is the author of the award-winning, New York Times bestselling Clementine series, the acclaimed novel Summer of the Gypsy Moths, and the picture books Meet the Dullards, Pierre in Love, and Sparrow Girl. She divides her time between Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and Florida.

Find Sara online: www.sarapennypacker.com   facebook.com/sarapennypacker


Clementine is having not so good of a week.


Winner or washout?



Clementine can't believe her ears her beloved teacher, Mr. D'Matz, might be leaving them for the rest of the year to go on a research trip to Egypt No other teacher has ever understood her impulsiveness, her itch to draw constantly, or her need to play "Beat the Clock" when the day feels too long.


Clementine has been picked for Friend of the Week, which means she gets to be line leader, collect the milk money, and feed the fish. Even better, she'll get a Friend of the Week booklet in which all the other third grade kids will write why they like her. Clementine's best friend Margaret has all sorts of crazy ideas for how Clementine can prove to the class she is a friend.


Clementine's having a nervous breakdown. The FAMILY MEETING sign is up in her house, and she just knows she's in trouble for something. Has she been too mean to her little brother? Too sloppy? Eating too much junk food? Try as she might to find out what's on the agenda, her parents won't reveal anything before the meeting.


For Clementine, spring is a really big deal. It's the time for seeing her apple tree start to grow, for watching her friend Margaret go crazy with spring cleaning, and for going on the school trip to Plimoth Plantation. Clementine is ready for Ye Olden Times, but she isn't so sure about surviving lunch there-the fourth graders have strict rules about no eating sounds. (What "is" snicking, anyway?


In this hilarious sequel to Stuart's Cape, Stuart is on his way to the first day of school. With his cape, though, Stuart is bound to have a day full of wacky adventures. Illustrations.


Saddle up with Flat Stanley

Ever since Stanley was flattened by a bulletin board, every trip is an adventure


A Flat Ninja?

Stanley and his brother, Arthur, are such huge fans of the movie star ninja Oda Nobu that they decide to send him something even better than fan mail--Stanley himself Soon enough, Flat Stanley is in Japan, seeing the country with his idol. But when trouble surprises them, it will take a real hero to save the day.



Ming-Li looked up and tried to imagine the sky silent, empty of birds. It was a terrible thought. Her country's leader had called sparrows the enemy of the farmers--they were eating too much grain, he said. He announced a great "Sparrow War" to banish them from China, but Ming-Li did not want to chase the birds away.